Latest Press

06.13.2019

In WBUR’s ‘The Artery’: New Toni Morrison Documentary Opens Roxbury International Film Festival With Gravity And Grace

“Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am” opens the 21st annual Roxbury International Film Festival on Thursday, June 20. (The event takes place at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Other festival venues include Hibernian Hall, Haley House Bakery Café, Berklee College of Music, and the Bruce C. Bolling Building.)

05.28.2019

In WBUR’s ‘The Artery:’ With ‘I Am A Man,’ Castle Of Our Skins Rewrites The Narrative Of Black Masculinity

Fed up with low wages and poor working conditions, more than a thousand black sanitation workers flooded the streets of Memphis on Feb. 12, 1968. The men, pushed to the breaking point by the death of their colleagues, Echol Cole and Robert Walker, who were “crushed by a malfunctioning truck,” went on strike. They protested with bold signage that decried “I AM A MAN.” That declaration demanding dignity and equality is at the center of Castle of Our Skins’ (COOS) latest project, “I AM A MAN 2019,” premiering June 2. Through music, film, history and more, “I AM A MAN 2019” examines that historical moment through the lens of contemporary concerns of black masculinity and humanity.

04.05.2019

In the Boston Herald: Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy lives on

On April 10, more than 200 are expected to attend the 14th anniversary of the Cape Verdean-Jewish seder (capeverdeanjewishseder.com) at Hibernian Hall. Seders that reach out to include other faiths and nationalities always remind me of the many important contributions made by the Jewish community in support of the civil rights movement. They were foot soldiers whether marching beside Dr. King, wielding influence, contributing funds to the effort or encouraging their young people to actively participate on the Freedom Rides to register black voters, walk picket lines and speak out against racism.

04.04.2019

In DigBoston: BOSTON’S ‘RADICAL BLACK GIRL’ BUILDS ARTISTIC PLATFORMS WHERE THEY DIDN’T EXIST

The young women from Youth Options Unlimited had never performed, let alone danced, in front of a crowd before. Yet they found themselves at Hibernian Hall in Roxbury, set to perform a number built on their experiences living in Boston.For the previous five days the young women had practiced their performance in collaboration with a traveling research residency called “My City, My Body: or if Concrete Could Talk, or for those that might be traumatized.”